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Vegetable Juice and Spirulina: The verdict’s in.

6 Apr

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May be my new go to drink.  Yesterday, I blogged about Spirulina and how I wasn’t sure how I’d feel about Spirulina considering the reviews posted on Amazon, here and here.  I made some vegetable juice using red vine tomatoes, sunburst tomatoes, celery, carrots and kale.  I added a little seasoning.  Sample the juice.  Check. Add a teaspoon of Spirulina. Check. Blend juice well (I used a blender bottle). Check. Sample juice again. Check.

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The verdict is: my juice tasted like vegetables with and without the Spirulina.  Since I just did this roughly 20 minutes ago, I’ll have to wait and see if I feel like it has any effect on me.  Some people reported increased energy and a general sense of well being after using this supplement.  Some of the positives sound too good to be true, so I’ll listen to my body and see if it’s worth me using this supplement on a regular basis.  A pound of this dirty green stuff runs almost $30.

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(Completed product: Vegetable Juice and Spirulina)

It’s Green, stinks, but it’s (supposed to be) good for you!

5 Apr

Spirulina that is!

In a previous post, I talked about the juicing book I bought, The Big Book of Juices, by Natalie Savona.  Some of the recipes included Spirulina. Spiru what? Spirulina.  In my research, I found out that it’s a Superfood derived from the Ocean.  What was never mentioned (until I read an Amazon review) is that it is dark green and stinks.  In this review for Spirulina powder marketed by NOW foods, it’s described as everything except delicious, great-tasting, and platable.  However, in this review, many say Spirulina can be tolerated.  Apparently, where it’s harvested has a lot to do with the flavor which makes a lot of sense.  The Spirulina I bought is harvested from waters in Hawaii.  The earlier product from Now is harvested in India and it stinks (literally, lol!)

I describe myself as adventurous, so I immediately ordered a bottle of Spirulina Powder to add as a supplement to my fresh vegetable juices.  I just got it today, so I haven’t taken it for a test drive.  To be completely honest, I’m a bit scared.  I opened it up and it looks exactly as described: dark green powder resembling algae.  I quickly put the top back on and put it in the fridge.  Now all I have to do is make some vegetable juice, mix the Spirulina and Juice using this Blender Bottle I bought, as take it all down….I’ll be sure to check back in once I’ve become brave enough to drink the juice…

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What’s your go-to natural supplement?

Tried and True: Baked Garlic Prawns

29 Mar

UPDATE:    I made this last weekend and I have to say, I have never been so impressed with one of my culinary creations.  This recipe was perfect!  My almost two year old, that normally despises shrimp, ate more of this than I did.  It was easily doubled and EVERYONE enjoyed this.  I will definitely make it again.  Move over Red Lobster, here I come.

I do have to admit, my creation didn’t look as good as Barb’s over at Life in the Foothills (where I happily stole this recipe from), but it tasted D-E-L-I-C-I-O-U-S!  I thought I had Panko bread crumbs, but it turned out I didn’t, so I used regular Italian Bread Crumbs that I had on hand.  I do want to try this again with Panko.  However, anyway you make it, it will be great, so hurry, gather the ingredients and make this mouth watering delicacy.

P.S. Barb suggests having a glass of the Sauvignon Blanc with dinner.  I think it’s a must :o)

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Juicing My Way to Health: Cuisinart Compact Juice Maker (Review) + The Big Book of Juices (Review)

29 Mar

7 years ago, I had my first juicing experience.  I’m not sure how it came about, but I remember being pregnant with my second child.  Eating was difficult.  There wasn’t much that sounded appealing or appetizing.  Juicing helped me consume healthy food without all the “drama” surrounding food.  After my son was born, I sold my juicer on ebay.  For years, I kicked myself, but refused to invest in another.

An old friend brought juicing back to the forefront of my mind.  For $50 something, I got a Cuisinart Compact Juicer.  I couldn’t wait to make juice. So after a trip to the grocery store today, I made some juice…it was great!  My children wanted some as well, so I let them pick the fruits and/or veggies. Image

I picked up a copy of The Big Book of Juices by Natalie Savona.  I looked all over for this book and most places were OOS (out of stock) online for new copies OR the used copies being sold were priced outrageously.  Barnes and Noble lists the book for just under $12 + tax, but sadly they were OOS for shipping too.  I opted to do a store hold so I could pick it up today.  Buying it in-store cost me $20 + tax.

The high demand of this book is what drew me to it.  I even paid for it without taking one look at it.  I’m glad I got it.  The book boasts several simple juice/smoothie recipes.  The best part is that it rates each recipe on Energy, Detox, Immunity, Digestion, and Skin.  The beginning of the book starts out by describing juicing and smoothie making plus the differences between the two.  The author then lists several fruits and veggies + the benefits of them.

Now, I have to tell you that when I began today’s juicing session, I mixed several fruits and veggies randomly.  I was satisfied with all three juices that I made.  BUT, one reason why I love the Big Book of Juices is because of the simplicity of a lot of the recipes.  For example, one recipe includes just carrots and apples.  Another includes Apples and Oranges while a different recipe uses Apples and Guavas.  Many times, I think “the more the merrier”, but this book makes me feel as if “less is more”.  I believe it is a must-have, go-to book for anyone wondering about juicing or just beginning.  It’s great for those that already juice because of the ratings for each juice.

The Cuisinart Compact Juicer is awesome.  My only pet peeve is that it is compact.  Once I began going hard at juicing, I had to stop several times to empty the pulp and the 16oz juice container.  I should have thought my juicer decision through thoroughly before choosing a model.  With six people total in my household, a compact juicer may not be my best bet.  Other than that, the Cuisinart Compact Juicer is priced right at just about $100 most places.  Sam’s Club carries it for about $75.

Salmon Patties (Croquettes) Revisited

13 Apr

I felt like having Salmon Patties for lunch today, but didn’t feel like eating anything heavy.  My quest for healthy eating is a continual one.  I have to admit, it’s not as easy to keep up with as I thought.  That’s mainly because sometimes I find myself busy and away from home all day.  The easiest thing to do is pick up something while I’m out.  I don’t beat myself up for it, but I would like to be more consistent.  And, since I had planned on going to the gym after eating lunch, I knew I had to have a light meal.

What I came up with may sound weird, but it worked!  My first taste tester was my picky sister.  She dismisses food at the first sight of something visually displeasing or anything that smells funny (to her of course,lol)!  The heavenly aroma is what attracted her to my creation.

Quinoa Salmon Patties

Canned salmon in water

Minced Zucchini

Diced Onion

Diced Bell Pepper

Salt

Pepper

Oregano

Basil

Cooked Quinoa

Flour

Eggs

Mix all ingredients (with the exception of the last two to taste).  Add in enough egg and flour to act as a binder.  If you don’t, the patties will fall apart.  Heat a nonstick skillet over medium heat.  Add enough olive oil to coat the bottom of the pan.  Form hamburger like patties and fry till desired crispiness on each side.  Serve hot.

These babies were full of flavor and filling!  After several hours, I was still satisfied.  I never felt that lazy, must take a nap full, but I was no longer hungry and absolutely happy!

 

Oh, I must add that the kids (ages 3 and 13) enjoyed them too!

Chili With Quinoa

14 Mar

It’s what for dinner (tonight) lol!

While cruising around AllRecipes, I found a recipe for chili using quinoa (pronounced keen-wa).  I decided that I’d make it for dinner for three reasons: I love chili, it’s cheap, and it uses quinoa.

This particular recipes includes zucchini, cilantro, and jalapeno.  I didn’t have any of it so I opted to make chili the way I normally make it (albeit I did include the corn).   Ground turkey was substituted for ground beef because I believe it is healthier. I decided that I wouldn’t add the quinoa to the pot as I didn’t want it to soak up the liquid.  I have some sort of aversion to adding noodles, rice, quinoa, etc. to the pot for that very reason.  The last thing I did was include a couple tablespoons of horseradish sauce because I like strong flavors and had it on hand.

My end result was a delicious pot of chili that is kid approved!  Yummy!  How do you incorporate healthy alternatives into food and still make it kid approved?